15 Comments
Mar 18Liked by Vittles

Great piece! Very similar cream buns - often shaped like a longer roll - are a staple of small town bakeries in New Zealand

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Mar 19Liked by Vittles

Cream buns in Australia are also very similar, and the best buns were from bakeries that used real cream. Few and far between now.

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I have fond memories of cream buns as part of a bought lunch at school in the 70's in New Zealand. They were round like the pictures. Also Sally-Lunns !

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My grandmother likes to tell people that when she was allowed to buy her lunch from the tuckshop (Sydney, 1930s) she'd get a meat pie and a cream bun and it cost thruppence.

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Mar 18Liked by Vittles

Ooh, I love a Devon Split. And as well as the Italian wannabe, there is the Semlor bun from Scandanavia, which features a yeasted bun filled with lots of whipped double cream and also whipped marzipan.

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Mar 18Liked by Vittles

I was confident that this very interesting article would end with a recipe for Devon split, but no! Aha: https://thegreatbritishbakeoff.co.uk/recipes/all/paul-hollywoods-devonshire-splits/

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Ruby Tandoh has an excellent recipe for Thunder and Lightning buns in Crumb :)

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Loved reading this, but can I make a suggestion? The 39% dairy output stat should I think be in reference to the South West at large (as credible sources online point out) – definitely not just Devon.

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author

Thank you for spotting! This has now been corrected.

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I grew up lactose intolerant in Devon, a toughening experience. Outside my school however was the granary, a small bakery which sold all sorts, their milk free alternative was called a marshmellow split which was a baguette covered in sugar with marshmallows, haribos and sherbet inside, with the splash of jam in the middle. It was something else.

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We sold them in our family bakery (in kent) when I was a child. As a village bakery, fresh cream cakes were only made at the weekend and would vary from week to week. The Devonshire split was a favourite of mine and now you have me craving one. I shall have to get into the kitchen!

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I'm sure they were delicious!

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"Devonshire cream" (or just "clotted cream") not "Devonian cream". Devonian cream would be cream so old it was around 400 million years ago during the Devonian period, "the age of fish".

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What a lovely piece! I can’t think of anything I would like more to eat right now than a Devon Split, something I had forgotten existed!

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My grandmother also used to make her own cream, but maintains that Devonshire cream is prepared differently from Cornish clotted cream. Apparently one theory is that clotted cream, also popular in Turkey, was brought to the peninsula by the Phoenicians?!

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